Kenya Muiri

Kenya Muiri

The Muiri Coffee Farmer Co-operative in the Nairobi growing district of Kenya is a group of pro-active farmers who know good coffee. They have broken down a lot of  barriers in buyer transparency, and they have also managed to get their coffee certified as organic, which is nearly unheard of in Kenya. The Muiri co-op is active in promoting fair labor standards, organic farming, and high quality.

This particular lot of beans can be roasted light or medium or dark. Of course it will be most complex as a light roast -- we like it about 5 degrees beyond past when the 1st cracks end. You get a tart kiwi, peach, tropical fruits. If you speed the roast up a little bit between 300 degrees and 370 degrees it will give it a nice bright acidity, and then slow it down and coast it through the first cracks and sweeten it up. In too light of roasts, you get more tartness, and if you are a couple degrees too dark you get less juiciness. But right at the sweet spot you will taste a coffee that starts with kiwi, turns into juicy sweet peach, with a wine/red wine aftertaste. The medium roasts -- just shy of 2nd cracks or maybe just barely into 2nd cracks -- retain some of that acidity and sweetness and flashes of peach and papaya with a great lingering aftertaste. The coffee does very well as a dark roast -- about 20 seconds of 2nd cracks (or more if you really want to go crazy with it) and you get that roasty taste of dark coffee with underlying sweetness.

This is NOT classic Kenya in the "grapefruit, black currant" sense, but it is certainly a demonstration of what you can get out of a carefully grown, sorted, processed Kenya by farmers that know what they are doing. A very nice, memorable, special coffee indeed.

This particular lot of large AA sized beans is best roasted just past City roast, but before it hits Full City. In too light of roasts, you get more tartness, and if you are a couple degrees too dark you get less juiciness. But right at the sweet spot you will taste a coffee that starts with apricot jam, turns into juicy sweet peach, with a sweet-bread quality, like an apricot muffin. The ending gives you a dry peach wine/red wine aftertaste. It has a full body, moderate acidity, and is a startlingly fancy coffee that even the average coffee drinker would feel guilty putting cream and sugar in. The coffee does very well in a french press which smooths it out, highlights the body and peachy notes, and adds to the elegance. It also is very nice as a pour-over which highlights the brighter, sweeter, and fruity side of the coffee.

It has been a few years since I had a nice coffee with apricot tones, and I'm happy to have this in stock for you to try. This is NOT classic Kenya in the "grapefruit, black currant" sense, but it is certainly a demonstration of what you can get out of a carefully grown, sorted, processed Kenya by farmers that know what they are doing. A very nice, memorable, special coffee indeed.

US Arrival: August 2019